Types of Pediatric Emergency First Aid Care

Types of Pediatric Emergency First Aid Care

Posted by on Mar 1, 2017 in Childcare |

Assessing for an immediate life support for every child is critical and should be provided immediately just like adults in an emergency situation. The only difference between the two individuals is that when administering CPR and life support training  as you can see at www.lifesupport-rcms.co.uk to a child, you must be more careful because they are fragile and are more sensitive compared to the adults. Knowing when to implement immediate care to a suffering member of the family is important. Here are the following implementations of emergency care to every category and at the same time decision making is involve in every situation that you are facing.

Pediatric Common Emergency Cases

Nosebleed- this means that there is blood flowing in the nostrils either on both or one nostril. The occurrence of nosebleed happens when there is a ruptured blood vessel and most common causes of a nosebleed is when there is too much sneezing, blowing of the nose, and even high blood pressure. What to do? First priority is to stop the bleeding by putting pressure at the affected area and always keep an open air. Make sure that the child is on the sitting position as you keep the nose just above the heart to reduce more of the bleeding as well to drain the blood while leaning forward.

Choking- this happens when there is a blockage of airway at the esophagus area wherein intake of food or a foreign body has been swallowed by the child such as a coin, button and or other small pieces that were reached by the child. However, if there is no gag reflex in which no cough sounds or while choking does not have any sound, this calls for a very serious cause. What to do? Immediately clear the airway in the correct way without adding insult to the injury. It is important that you are able to act fast because there is an airway obstruction.

Hypothermia, Altered Thermoregulation among infants to 1 years old- The term hypothermia means there is a drop of the body temperature from 37 degrees Celsius. This body condition is considered to be fatal among infants and children and these alarms to have a CPR and life support training as you have learned from http://www.lifesupport-rcms.co.uk/cpr_training_courses.htm right away. If the child or infant is exposed to a cold temperature for a long period of time, signs and symptoms are the following, skin cold to touch, there is a decrease in temperature level for about 35 degrees Celsius, slow breathing, weak pulse, pale and shallow breathing. What to do? Warm the child up immediately with the use of a warmer clothes or a thermal blanket and assess for any decrease level of consciousness.

Dehydration – this happens when a child looses fluid in the body. They are more prone to dehydration because they tend to sweat a lot compared to adults. If the infant or child happens to have fever always make sure to provide oral hydration. If the child is suffering from any form of illness and has been vomiting and having diarrhea, if this is left untreated, the child might suffer into a more serious case of heat exhaustion which may lead to a CPR and life support training rescue.

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Dealing With Troublemakers At School

Dealing With Troublemakers At School

Posted by on Aug 23, 2016 in Childcare |

Every classroom has one, and every school needs one. There’s always that one kid who pushes back during lessons and want to be loud and sometimes aggressive. Some children only know how to gain attention by behaving badly as they crave any kind of attention they can get. This isn’t the easiest thing to deal with as a teacher but there are some effective ways of dealing with troublemakers and honestly it takes a pretty strong teacher to deal with a troublemaker and not feel overwhelmed.

A lot of teachers use agencies such as www.rikama-education.com to find work and while these agencies are good at supporting teachers with workplace conflict, it doesn’t include conflict with pupils. Teachers deal with troubled students in many different ways and it sounds obvious but verbal communication is the first step. Sometimes pupils haven’t actually been well informed of the actions versus consequences rule especially if they don’t have this established at home. Some kids work differently and actually enjoy conflict with a teacher. These children tend to enjoy being in the centre of the drama and the argument causes a spectacle to the rest of the children and they actually enjoy the result of this. Non-verbal communication is important here because just subtly standing near a troublemaker’s desk can avoid drama. Also, the non-verbal approach can actually work better than a confrontation as it’s not giving into what the student wants.

Never compare one student with another as the feeling of not being good enough isn’t productive or conducive for working together. You want to be a person who won’t take any misbehaviour while balancing a certain amount of absorption of bad behaviour. Think carefully about the threats you make and how you carry out your consequences because if you make empty threats and not carry them through, you will lose the authority and the whole class will know it. If you speak to www.rikama-education.com you can get some guidance about speaking to the head teacher and the parents about the troublemaker in your classroom.

There’s an argument for ‘love-bombing’ when it comes to children and while this is great in the home, at school a variation can always work. Love bombing is overdoing the praise when a child does something well even down to the little things and not giving any attention to bad behaviour. Doing this at school works slightly differently, you want to give the bad behaved child something to focus on and be responsible for something in the classroom so they can take pride in an achievement. Try and get to the root of the misbehaviour and find out why they’re acting out. Chances are you may be able to actually help and make a difference in the child’s life whether that’s helping with an outside issue or whether there is bullying going on so they become the class clown to get better attention and take them away from ridicule.

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5 Time Management Tips for New Teachers

5 Time Management Tips for New Teachers

Posted by on Aug 23, 2016 in Childcare |

Being a teacher takes up an awful lot of time. Evenings and weekends and even early mornings can be eaten up by planning and paperwork. Time management is a huge challenge for most teachers and even seasoned teachers can still find it difficult to manage time effectively. That isn’t because they aren’t good at managing their day, not at all, but the demands of teaching can be so huge that burning the candle at both ends can be draining. Agencies like www.rikama-education.com hire in teachers and make it their business to ensure teachers are briefed on time management before taking up a new position.

  • Think about when you work best. Going into school before 7am doesn’t mean you’re better at your job than a teacher who arrives after 8am. When you’re looking for a job with rikama-education.com you’ll be walked through your day and how you manage your time so that when you’re being prepped for interview they can shine you in the best light. Plan a power hour for each day when you give yourself some uninterrupted time to get things done.
  • When you’re planning your lessons for your children you’ll be of course thinking of the workload they will have. Homework and projects are given our by most teachers and they can be bogged down, but teachers tend not to think about their own workloads. If you have a lesson that will give you a huge amount of marking to do, balance it with another where you can give verbal feedback or a lesson where peer assessment is allowed.
  • Be careful trying to be perfect. If your documents have perfectly aligned images and clip art, is your class really going to notice? It’s all well and good going that extra mile for the class by designing your paperwork excellently but if it’s not going to have any impact on the class, don’t waste your time.
  • Diariase everything. As a teacher you’ll appreciate a heavy workload so buying a sturdy diary to document and plan everything will help. Being vigilant about your time in the classroom will help you to identify the times in the week that are extremely busy and in those times you can learn the pattern and then break it down a little.
  • Get to know the staffroom. It may be tempting to plan more or mark more or generally do ‘more’ in the classroom during your given breaks, but try and break that habit. By taking yourself out of the staffroom you effectively alienate yourself from the work support system you could have.

Ultimately, when you want to look for work using an agency like www.rikama-education.com can really help. You’ll be able to be guided through the process from start to finish and your CV will be marketed to roles that are appropriate for your skillset. By taking that step you can go ahead and enjoy your work placements knowing you’re doing everything for yourself and your wellbeing as well as your new classes.

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